Congratulations to Professor Geraldine Van Bueren and all the the new commissioners at the Equality and Human Rights Commission

Posted on November 28, 2009. Filed under: Books, Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

New Commissioner appointments have just been announced to Britain’s Equality and Human Rights Commission. It is envisaged that the three-year appointments, announced by Harriet Harman, Minister for Women and Equality, will bolster most considerably the Commission’s ongoing and future work on gender, sex orientation, race, religion and belief, age, disability, and human rights in general, as well as its work with employers in both the private and public sector.

Commissioner Van Bueren - courtesy of TheGuardian.co.uk


Of the appointments, all worthy and deserving in their own way, we would like to single out for particular congratulations, Professor Geraldine Van Bueren. Professor, or should we say Commissioner Van Bueren, has not only an illustrious legal and academic career to her credit, but is also a distinguished author of some very important core human rights texts that we should bring to the attention of our readers.

They are (in chronological order):

*Child Rights in Europe: Convergence and Divergence in Judicial Protection

*Article 40: Child Criminal Justice (Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, 40)

*Childhood Abused: Protecting Children Against Torture, Cruel, Inhuman, and Degrading Treatment and Punishment

*International Law on the Rights of the Child (International Studies in Human Rights)

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The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – European and Scandinavian Perspectives (Brill Academic Publishers, 2009)

Posted on June 24, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights | Tags: , , , , |

The very first human rights treaty adopted by the United Nations in the twenty first century was The International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Its aim is to secure the effective and equal human rights for the estimated 650,000,000 persons with disabilities the world over. It reaches this goal by by tailoring gerneral human rights norms to their circumstances. It mirrors and advances the shift away from welfare to rights in the context of disability. The Convention itself represents a mix between non-discrimination and other substantive human rights and gives practical effect to the idea that all human rights are indivisible and interdependent. This collection of essays, edited meticulously by Oddný Arnardóttir, Mjöll, and Gerard Quinn, examines these developments from the global, European and Scandinavian perspectives and the challenge of transposing its provisions into national law. It marks the exciting coming of age of disabilty as a core human rights concern.

A book worth owning. Our thumbs up.

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