Archive for April, 2009

New text alert – ‘Law of the European Convention on Human Rights’ by Harris, O’Boyle & Warbrick (Oxford, 2009) – Now Out!!

Posted on April 30, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights | Tags: , , , , |

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UPDATE 6/5/09
This item is now available. Grab your copy at Amazon: US , UK, Canada.

Dr. Ed Bates is a senior lecturer at the University of Southampton Law School. He is joined by Deputy Registrar Michael O’Boyle of the European Court of Human Rights and Professor David Harris CMG, a Co-Director of the Human Rights Law Center at the University of Nottingham, as the main and highly impressive line-up of authors for this text. A great line-up of contributors to a text that should now be well honed and updated, going into it’s second edition. Considered by many as a leading and seminal work in its first edition, should give us much to look forward to with the impending release of the 2nd. It is due out between now and July. Some reports have led us to believe that a limited run sold out instantly, but recent publisher accounts have told us of a possible re-release around mid-May. Keep an eye out for it!

See the Oxford University Press blurb here

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Can women outdo the men? Book Review: ‘Through the Labyrinth: the truth about how women become leaders’ by Linda Carli and Alice Eagly

Posted on April 27, 2009. Filed under: Books, Human Rights | Tags: , , |

LabyrinthJacket_001_001

The days of ‘mens club’ leadership has dissipated somewhat, albeit still present. As this new paradigm is moving to the fore, so too is a whole new collateral industry developed with those willing to study, explain and profit from it. Not all of those that involve themselves with female leadership can be considered sucker fish at the gills of a large shark however. The present authors must be exluded from the latter and are to be commended for their work in the field and with this treatise.

It doesn’t seem that long ago that women in leadership was a concept that was chuckled at in the male dominated boardrooms across the world. But the most recent generational changes have seen a definite shift in the concept and reality of female leaders in positions of power and importance. It is now commonplace and accepted. It is, rightfully, more and more the norm.

Alice Eagley and Linda Carli are two psychologists and respected academics who have given much of their lives to the teaching of the psychology of gender and organisational psychology – especially sex differences in similarities in leadership. They apply their years of wisdom and experience here in this, their book, ‘Through the Labyrinth : The truth about how women become leaders’.
Their mooted metaphor change of a labyrinth (from the ‘glass ceiling’ methaphor) fits nicely with their arguments, summations and fascinating reccomendations that women must find their own individualistic style with a ‘twice as good’ as men approach to overcome the many natural obstacles, unfair stereotypes and discriminatory stigmas still attached to female advancement on the corporate ladder today.
The book acts as a tangible, comprehensive one stop shop on this important topic. It provides a commanding overview in compliment to the sometimes confusing plethora of materials inside the academia and outside that already exist in large number. Carli and Eagley quickly cut to the core of what leadership truly means and how different styles, context and settings can determine how female leadership rates in success when compared to their male counterparts under similar and dissimilar influencing properties.
While this work has a very academic and professional feel to it, it is still couched in terms and language that most of us can relate to. ‘Through the Labyrinth : The truth about how women become leaders’ should be read by everyone from policy makers, leadership coaches, students to lay people alike. This book would make a priceless addition to any local/municipal library, large public library or highly specialised library collection. It has our thumbs up for acquisition.

Table of Contents:

*Is there still a glass ceiling? *Where are the women leaders? *Are men natural leaders? *Do family responsibilities hold women back? *Is discrimination still a problem? *What is the psychology of prejudice toward female leaders? *Do people resist women’s leadership? *Do women lead differently from men? *Do organizations compromise women’s leadership? *How do some women find their way through the labyrinth? *How good are women leaders and what does their future hold? p>

Accolades: 2007 McKinsey Award winner

Linda Carli, speaks of the glass ceiling here in this podcast link

Amazon links:
US

UK/EU

Canada

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Was “Old Hickory” i.e. Andrew Jackson an ethnic cleanser? BOOK Review Pulitzer Prize Winner 2009: Biography Prize – ‘American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House’ by Jon Meacham

Posted on April 20, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights | Tags: , , , , , |

Newsweek editor, Jon Meacham, has taken out the ‘biography prize’ at the 2009 Pulitzer Awards held at Columbia University for his work ‘American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House,’ a best-seller about the populist US president whose sympathy for the less fortunate never extended to slaves.

“Jackson represents the best and the worst of us” Meacham said of his work

Apparently Meachem accessed materials not and/or rarely consulted before, to bring us this fascinating page turner. ‘Old Hickory’ Andrew Jackson was a great defender of democracy and it’s founding principles, yet he was a man tainted by his rich life as much as he was honoured. It is highly open for debate whether he would be considered a human rights abuser and ethnic cleanser today in hindsight. He stood for the defense of human rights, yet in the same breath seemed to attack them. Meacheam does a great job in giving humanity to a man that history has been unkind to in so many ways, justifiably or not. Meachem deserves praise for highlighting the positives of the 7th President of the US as much as the US$20 bill does. He is very adept at political PR.

The book is a good addition to the historical understanding of American political history, slavery and the plight of Native Americans. Meacham’s background as a journalist lends greatly to the readability of this text. It is not an academic work, but that is what makes this work. It is more like a compelling storytelling newspiece than a dry ‘academic standard’ american history textbook.
Get it now. It doesn’t disappoint. One could expect to build it up too much in the expectation stakes before reading it, especially after the media frenzy surrounding the winning of a pulitzer, but we were pleasantly surprised that it was as good as the media that covered its accolade made out.

The story of Jackson is certainly not one that is settled between historians. To get a feel for the other side of the historical coin on him, not just the legend, we enourage prospective readers to also consider having a read of Professor of History – Andrew Bursteins ‘The Passions of Andrew Jackson’ (Vintage, 2004) contemoraneously with Meachams work. We suspect the truth lies somewhere in between the two versions.

Amazon US:
Meachams: ‘American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House’
Professor Bursteins: ‘The Passions of Andrew Jackson’

Amazon UK:
Meachems: ‘American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House’
Professor Bursteins: ‘The Passions of Andrew Jackson’

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Pulitzer Prize Winners 2009 : non-fiction award – ‘Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II’

Posted on April 20, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights | Tags: , , , |

Well, the Pulitzer Prize winners for 2009 have been announced this morning at Columbia University and this year the awards for human rights pieces are admirable. The general nonfiction award went to “Slavery by Another Name : The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II” by Douglas A. Blackmon, the Atlanta bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal.

“It’s a huge honor for me,” Blackmon said of his Pulitzer, “but more importantly I hope it really validates the idea that this is a part of American history that we have ignored and neglected, and it’s time for a really dramatic reinterpretation of what happened to African-Americans during that period of time.”

Check the book out here at Amazon, as we here at the Human Rights Book Review intend to-

Amazon US: Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II

Amazon UK: Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II

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‘Defining Civil and Political Rights: the jurisprudence of the United Nations Human Rights Committee’ authors Richard Burchill and Alex Conte (Ashgate 2009).

Posted on April 17, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

This book’s main focus is international human rights and deals particularly well with with the Human Rights Committee’s jurisprudence and their issuing of non-binding yet highly influential decisions that help direct the large number of member states ratifying the optional protocol. Coupled with the authors exhaustive analysis this is a text that helps us all in the comprehension of international obligation under the ICCPR in an easy and highly accessible way.

This work is an extremely useful text for those that may practice or educate in the human rights domain and more specifically those that deal regularly with instruments such as the ICCPR, it’s obligations, and those that administer it on an international level and domestic state level(those that have ratified this instrument have been included in one of the appendices in the book). 
A must own guide for any serious human rights advocate.

 UK/EU link
Defining Civil and Political Rights: The Jurisprudence of the United Nations Human Rights Committee

US link
Defining Civil and Political Rights: The Jurisprudence of the United Nations Human Rights Committee

Contents: Preface; Introduction, Alex Conte and Richard Burchill; Procedure under the optional protocol, Alex Conte; Limitations to and derogations from covenant rights, Alex Conte; Democratic and civil rights, Alex Conte; Security of the person, Alex Conte; The judicial process, Alex Conte; Privacy, honour, and reputation, Alex Conte; Rights of the family and children, Richard Burchill; Self-determination, Richard Burchill; Minority rights, Richard Burchill; Equality and non-discrimination, Richard Burchill; Appendices; Index.

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Leap In The Dark: Book Review: Human Rights Watch: World Report 2008

Posted on April 14, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

We felt this was a very good review of the Human Rights Watch Report for 2008. But don’t take our word for it. Read it for yourself. Our comments to be added soon.

Leap In The Dark: Book Review: Human Rights Watch: World Report 2008

Amazon US link Human Rights Watch World Report 2008

Amazon UK Link HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH WORLD REPORT 2008

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New Technologies and Human Rights by Thérèse Murphy (ed) (Oxford University Press, 2009)

Posted on April 11, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

This new book by Professor Therese Murphy of Nottingham University and a collection of other respected authors/academics reminds us how far technologies can jump ahead of law and regulation and how those new technologies certainly portend an emerging urgency by regulators to tread carefully yet still develop statute with haste. Haste and considered regulation are often an uncontemporaneous mix, yes, however that does not preclude the new reality that law must catch up fast before technolgies which hold such promise metamorphasise into frankentsein technologies, as so many feared with gm crops as one example. Not only does this work call for regulation full stop but faster, better and more refined legislative processes that can consider and weigh ethical dilemmas, clinical risks and most importantly precautionary principles.

Contents

*Repetition, revolution, and resonance : an introduction to new technologies and human rights by Thérèse Murphy
*Human dignity, ethical pluralism, and the regulation of modern biotechnologies by Roger Brownsword
*Regulating human genetics in a neo-eugenic era by Han Somsen
*Constitutional patriotism and the right to privacy : a comparison of the European *Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights by Francesca Bignami
*New technologies, the precautionary principle, and public participation by Laurence Boisson de Chazournes
*The texture of reproductive choice : law, ethnography, and reproductive technologies by Thérèse Murphy
*The international law of genetic discrimination : the power of ‘never again’ by Iulia Voina Motoc
*Individual human rights in genetic research : blurring the line between collective and individual interests by Hélène Boussard

US Link
New Technologies and Human Rights (Collected Courses of the Academy of European Law)

UK Link
New Technologies and Human Rights (Collected Courses of the Academy of European Law)

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Racism : deal with it before it gets under your skin by Anne Marie Aikins ; illustrated by Steven Murray (James Lorrimer Publishers, 2004)

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

Another wonderful addition to the ‘Deal with it’ series from Anne Marie Aikins.
‘Racism: Deal with it’ uses bread and butter scenarios to help the youngest of minds identify some of the earliest origins of racial and cultural conflicts that may be encountered. This book, coupled with guidance from early life educators and parents will help children
relate to and appreciate some of the basic obstacles encountered with racism and how we might triumph over them.

US Link:
Racism: Deal with it Before It Gets Under Your Skin (Deal With It series)

UK/EU Link:
Racism: Deal with It Before It Gets Under Your Skin

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Privacy : deal with it like nobody’s business by Diane Peters ; illustrated by Jeremy Tankard.

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

The ‘Deal with it’ series are great resources for teachers and young children attempting to grasp basic yet very important issues for their first time.
This ‘Deal with it’ monograph book deals with the first Privacy issues may encounter. From coping with secrets to playing it safe when surfing and engaging on the internet, these examples set sound foundations for understanding more hefty privacy issues later in life. The comic format is a winner to grab the kids attention. A must own for most primary school educator’s and municipal libraries aiming to educate at a juvenile level.

US Link: Privacy, Deal With It: Like Nobody’s Business

UK Link: Privacy: Like Nobody’s Business (Deal with It)

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Human rights in crisis (edited by Alice Bullard, Ashgate, 2008)

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

UK Link
Human Rights in Crisis

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‘Blown to Bits’ by Abelson, Ledeen and Lewis (Addison Wesley, 2008)

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

While this book seems to detail the positives of technology and mankinds willingness to ‘go with the flow’, it does carry some very important lessons of

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The Spy in the Coffee Machine – O’Hara and Shadbolt (Oneworld Publications, 2008)

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

A very up to date book looking at how modern technologies and those that apply them have eaten into our daily lives and hence our freedoms. In our quest to move with technologies at fast pace, we all seem to easily ignore…

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The Governance of Privacy by Bennett and Raab (MIT Press, 2008)

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

This book is one that all regulators and policy makers should read. Rather than concentrating on pedantic throughputs of compliance based work, a broader more obective birds-eye approach is encouraged where end results of social equity are pursued and valued more highly.

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The Governance of Privacy by Bennett and Raab (MIT Press, 2008)

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

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Privacy: A manifesto

Posted on April 3, 2009. Filed under: Human Rights |

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